TES: Maple Hayes school for Dyslexics.

Moderators: Debbie Hepplewhite, maizie, Lesley Drake, Susan Godsland

Post Reply
User avatar
Susan Godsland
Administrator
Posts: 4973
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 11:10 pm
Location: Exeter UK
Contact:

TES: Maple Hayes school for Dyslexics.

Post by Susan Godsland » Sun May 04, 2008 12:11 pm

I'm stunned to learn that we, tax-payers, are contributing to the costs of educational provision here :shock:

If, what they are providing, is supposed to be a huge improvement on the interventions that children are receiving in state schools, then it just goes to show the absolutely dire state of remedial provision for struggling readers around the country.

TES Magazine. 2nd May:
Orient Success.
Severe dyslexia does not have to be a byword for failure. A school using martial arts and a novel approach to reading and writing is seeing remarkable results.
It may look like an old-fashioned boarding school, but Maple Hayes is a day school and the 95 pupils are all severely dyslexic. It is one of only 10 independent schools for specific learning difficulties in England, and the only one in the Midlands.

"This," says Daryl Brown, head of the school, "is the last chance saloon." Maple Hayes takes "the really hard cases": pupils for whom all other approaches have failed.

To get their sons and daughters into Maple Hayes, two-thirds of the parents have had to fight, usually via special needs tribunals, to have the £12,000 - £15,000 fees paid by a local education authority.....

The children who come here may have reading and writing problems, but they are intelligent.
"We take pupils showing a significant difference between their performance level and what their IQ indicates they ought to be able to do," says Daryl. The emphasis is on essay subjects, such as English and history, and on giving full sentence answers in others. And pupils do not choose options at the end of Year 9. That might encourage them to drop subjects in which they're perfectly capable of getting a good GCSE grade later.

The result, as admiring inspectors have pointed out, is that children who join the school at a level where they would be expected to leave with no qualifications gain a clutch of good GCSEs. All sit at least five and many take 10 or 11. And the fact that 60 per cent achieve five good grades compares well with the results of a normal secondary school.

At the heart of this are techniques for helping pupils to read and write that are unique. They do not use phonics or a multi-sensory approach. "These children have experienced years of failure trying that," says Daryl, "and there's no point in trying again." The Maple Hayes technique sorts words into morphemes (units of meaning). These are either spelt conventionally by a combination of letters, or represented by simple images called icons. A word containing "vis", for instance, will have something to do with seeing, so a vital chunk of the word can be represented by an image that looks like eyes.

Sense of achievement
The approach uses only one sense at a time, to block out distractions.
Reading is visual rather than aural (early lessons are almost silent), while writing practice is by touch, using cursive script where the pen stays on the paper. To help pupils concentrate, they will be blindfolded at first.


These techniques were devised by Daryl's father, Neville, a former English teacher who set up the school 25 years ago and is its principal.
While acting as head of department in his secondary school, he became fascinated by the problems some pupils had with language. He developed methods they used to help themselves into teaching techniques that he tried out and used as the basis for a doctorate in psychology. They have been used at Maple Hayes ever since.
http://www.dyslexia.gb.com/abstractENB.htm
Last edited by Susan Godsland on Sun May 04, 2008 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

chew8
Posts: 4101
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 6:26 pm

Post by chew8 » Sun May 04, 2008 12:17 pm

I'm pretty sure that the weakest speller we ever had when I was teaching students aged 16+ was from this school. He scored 1 out of 70 on the part of the Schonell test I used (Nos. 31-100).

jenny C.

User avatar
maizie
Administrator
Posts: 3117
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 10:38 pm
Location: N.E England

Post by maizie » Sun May 04, 2008 12:34 pm

They do not use phonics or a multi-sensory approach. "These children have experienced years of failure trying that," says Daryl,
Well, if they've been doing all the feeling the letters in black bags, having them written on their backs & making them out of play-dough, + a nice OG programme, then I suspect that there is some truth in this statement :grin:

User avatar
Susan Godsland
Administrator
Posts: 4973
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2003 11:10 pm
Location: Exeter UK
Contact:

Post by Susan Godsland » Sun May 04, 2008 1:13 pm

I'm pretty sure that the weakest speller we ever had when I was teaching students aged 16+ was from this school.
But, Jenny, you didn't provide him with 'icons' to read the words ;-) I wonder if his eventual employer did, either?

Why do independent, specialist 'dyslexia' schools provide such quirky and unproven methods to teach reading, often at tax-payers expense?

Fairley House:
Of the 125 pupils at the school, 21 are paid for by local authorities.
Multi-Sensory Approach: To help learn words beginning with "squ", pupils squeeze oranges. For "shr", they shred paper.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/ma ... edys03.xml

User avatar
Debbie Hepplewhite
Administrator
Posts: 3632
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 4:13 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Sun May 04, 2008 1:45 pm

Oh for goodness sake - the world is truly mad.

This would be precisely the kind of scenario where we need to set up comparisons - comparing balderdash and pink and fluffy with good systematic teaching.

What is the likelihood that those poor kids actually had the kind of synthetic phonics teaching we are advocating now when we are still struggling to get synthetic phonics into place for mainstream teaching and this is, in any event, being undermined by flawed intervention techniques by age 6?

JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Subject

Post by JIM CURRAN » Mon May 05, 2008 9:44 pm

Fairley House:
Quote:
Of the 125 pupils at the school, 21 are paid for by local authorities.
Multi-Sensory Approach: To help learn words beginning with "squ", pupils squeeze oranges. For "shr", they shred paper.

The lunatics are running the asylum.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests