posting on senco forum

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lks
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posting on senco forum

Post by lks »

HFW Can anyone help?

I used to have a copy of these words from the back of the National Literacy
Strategy.

I seem to have lost them.

I have been trawling the Internet, but with the wishy washy revised Primary
Strategy this list no longer seems to exist.

Does anyone have a copy of this list?
I need it for a presentation at a staff meeting.
See nothing much has changed then :shock:

How are you all? My daughter is going from strength to strength and is now (apparently) the strongest reader in the group the senco takes. She is still rather weak on comprehension, but considering it was only May 2006 that our tutor started to teach her to read correctly, I don't find that surprising. We no longer go to the lessons but I am still in contact with this most marvellous tutor. In the group the senco teaches, my daughter says they take it in turns to read, if a child is struggling with a word, the senco asks them to look at the shape of the word or the pictures in the book, or to have a guess aaaaahhhhh. My daughter, bless her, who does have language and communication problems, told the senco that she doesn't guess words. In fact the only words she does seem to struggle with in these books are people's or place names, which even if she has decoded them properly, are not always obvious whether they are right or wrong. In the Burt reading test recently she read to equvalent 11.5 yrs. On that assessment, that is an improvement of 5 years. I am so proud of her.

chew8
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Post by chew8 »

I don't know if this helps: if you have 'Letters and Sounds' in your school, it has a list of the words which occur most frequently in children's books. The first 100 are listed in order of frequency on p. 193, and then listed again on p. 194, this time arranged in phases according to whether or not they are decodable in that phase - e.g. in Phase 3 'see' becomes decodable but 'was' is still 'tricky' because the /o/ sound for the letter 'a' is not introduced until Phase 5 ('was', 'what', 'wash', 'want', 'squash' etc.).

The next 200 most common words are listed on p. 194.

Jenny C.

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Debbie Hepplewhite
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Post by Debbie Hepplewhite »

We are all so very thrilled and proud of your daughter's achievements in reading.

Well done to you, your daughter and your daughter's tutor.

I cannot tell you how it makes me feel to hear success stories.

I know that you will now do your utmost for other children who are still getting the rubbish of various intervention initiatives which involve guessing words and no, or minimal, blending.

You have made my day with your wonderful news about your daughter's progress!!!! :lol:

As one of my daughter's headteachers said to me many years ago, "Be a trail blazer" - go and be a trail blazer in your corner of the world!!!! ;-)

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Debbie Hepplewhite
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Post by Debbie Hepplewhite »

PS: Please would you mind posting your daughter's reading results etc. under 'success stories' on the www.syntheticphonics.com message board. The more stories we have on there, the better!

Thank you in anticipation! :grin:

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maizie
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Post by maizie »

I don't think lks was actually asking for the information for herself - she is quoting a post from the SENCo forum.

I shall, if she doesn't mind, edit it to make the SENCo posting a quote, then it will be clearer. Some of the SENCOs are deeply wedded to their HFWs. It's obviously causing some consternation that they have disappeared from the new Framework :???:

lks
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Post by lks »

Thanks Maizie ;-) Debbie thanks for your kind words. I shall be delighted to post. I hate to think where we would have been if I hadn't found this forum. I will, in my own small way, make sure other parents get to hear about SP. I have almost given up with our school :roll: I have managed to put 2 other parents on to the SP path for their children

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Post by Kelly »

I personally don't have a problem with HFW as long as the child is only given the words that they DO know how to decode and the child is encouraged to decode the word and not guess from the shape.

I encourage the children to get some fluency with these words as we work our way through the curriculum. I can't see any harm in them as long as the are approached in a SP manner.

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maizie
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Post by maizie »

I don't think anyone sees any harm in them if approached in an SP way. As we know, most of them are easily decodable, given the right level of phonic knowledge!

But today, I have once again sat reading an IEP, which has clearly followed the child all the way through primary, and on into Y7, which says 'to learn to read and spell the 45 HFWs. :evil:

While SENCOs remain fixated on the notion that a child MUST learn to read & spell the HFWs, to the apparent exclusion of all else, some children are going to get nowhere....

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Debbie Hepplewhite
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Post by Debbie Hepplewhite »

I don't think people fully appreciate how pitifully small a number '45' is or '100' words is in the scale of things.

If you write a cumulative word bank for one spelling version of the 42+ sounds (a simple code), you easily have 600+ words.

To focus for several primary years on the 45 reception high frequency words, which is unbelievably common on English IEPs (individual education plans), is nothing short of inexplicable and criminal!

But that is the reality.

I wouldn't be surprised, right now, if there are many IEPs still with those 45 words as the target.

kenm
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Post by kenm »

maizie wrote:But today, I have once again sat reading an IEP,
Definition, please.
which has clearly followed the child all the way through primary, and on into Y7, which says 'to learn to read and spell the 45 HFWs.
I'll put that on the list too, just for completeness.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

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maizie
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Post by maizie »

IEP = Individual Education Plan. A statutory requirement for a child with a statement of Special Educational Needs or at Band D on the SEN Code of Practice.

It is supposed to set out, among other things, the 'targets' that the child is working towards. For children with difficulty in learning to read and write the first 'target' is usually 'to learn to read and spell the YR 45 High frequency Words'. This is often set in YR or Y1 and pursues the child relentlessly through its school career. Because, no amount of flash carding whole words, playing games of word 'snap' or the many other ingenious ways that are contrived to attempt to teach the child these words, actually works, so the child doesn't 'learn' them and they are deemed unteachable. While they are engaged in this fruitless task, other considerations, such as teaching them the alphabetic code, fly out of the window. (or the poor little souls are labelled 'hard to teach' and get a dose of Reading Wreckovery).

Sometimes the child reaches KS3 being able to read those 45 words, but very little else. What a waste of time. But it's one of the things that teachers have had to tick off. Children should 'know' the 45 words by the end of YR. If they don't, heaven help them...

That's why I dislike the HFWs so much, they limit expectations of children and blind teachers to the possibility that there is more to reading than knowing 45 insignificant words :sad:

lks
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Post by lks »

Hear hear Maizie. The 45 HFW were on my daughter's I.E.P. from reception to yr 4!!! Targets on I.E.P's are supposed to be specific and achievable HFWs are not, when they are taught in the way they are at most schools. We have another 'wonderful' target on her I.E.P. at the moment. It is to learn 10 spellings per week, including 7 words from the 'phonic scheme' (I'm still waiting for them to tell me what it is) and 3 topic words. You may ask what is wrong with that, well as far as I can see this target will remain for a long time on her I.E.P. until she learns to spell all words perhaps. A spelling target is something all of the children have and should have no place on an individual education plan. They have no strategies as to how they will help her at school. At home we get out the white board and our 'sounds' written on cardboard and work much the same as she used to in her private lessons.

JIM CURRAN
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Subject

Post by JIM CURRAN »

Most IEP’s are a waste of time and written to cover the teachers back. I’m not blaming teachers for this, it’s all part of the failed system that is the black hole of special education.
As someone on this Board pointed out some time ago IEP’s don’t teach children to read.

willow
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Post by willow »

lks I would like to add my congratulations on your daughter's progress and your persistence in making sure she is taught properly.

Every day I am thankful that I found the right sites, information, helpful people and inspirational stories at a very early stage in my children's educational career and they are now forever 'school' proofed.

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Post by Derrie Clark »

What do teachers need to be able to teach children to read and write and to produce effective IEPs in relation to literacy?

Unfortunately, pupils who don't demonstrate the necessary 'learning' at certain points of a content based curriculum, are considered to be separate and different rather than members of a pupil population whose skill and knowledge falls on a continuum. They are often referred to as an homogenous group in partronising and 'charitable' terms.

They are not taught the skills and knowledge, rather an attempt is made to drill them with more content. 'Strategies' for teaching these pupils? Writing their name, typically in the sand, and sightwords for example - they are not at a high enough level for FLS or ALS. Jim - your absolutely right the teachers are not to blame, they have not been furnished with the skills and knowledge and stick to doing the same or what they have seen written down somewhere. Maizie - 45 words is actually quite optimistic - I continue to see pupils plodding through primary with the Reception List of words on their IEPs.

And . . . if Letters and Sounds is going to be so effective and Reading Recovery is not there to shore up 'poor teaching' in Year R, then why is more money being invested in Reading Recovery?

If Letters and Sounds is effective then what happens to those Reading Recovery trained teachers, special rooms, resources, ringfenced funding, etc?

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