Hearing Impaired 7 year old

This forum has been created to provide a non-challenging environment for teachers and parents new to using synthetic phonics.

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Tricia
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Hearing Impaired 7 year old

Post by Tricia » Tue Nov 17, 2009 10:10 am

Hi there,

This child has had a severe hearing impairment which is now mild. Her reading and her speech are both very delayed and her mum is wondering how to help her.

My gut feeling is to use her hearing and her her lip-reading ability to associate sounds with symbols and continue as you would with a hearing child but I wanted to run that past the experts with this age group.

Does anyone here have experience using "all through the word" phonics with a child with similar needs?

Her mum is trained in ThatReadingThing so understands the principles and is excited about how they might help her daughter catch up with her peers.

Any help much appreciated!
Tricia Millar
http://www.thatreadingthing.com
http://trt-for-teachers.com/
@TRT_Tricia

kenm
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Post by kenm » Tue Nov 17, 2009 1:45 pm

Relevant information that an expert (probably not me) will find useful.

1 How old is she now?

2 How bad was her impairment?

3 When was her hearing improved (how might be interesting also)?
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

kenm
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Post by kenm » Tue Nov 17, 2009 1:59 pm

There is a Wikipedia article about language acquisition.* What I have not yet discovered is whether there is a critical or optimal period for easy acquisition of grammar and, if so, whether it is later in infants whose initial deafness is corrected.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

frances5
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Post by frances5 » Mon Nov 30, 2009 3:20 pm

The national deaf children's society has plenty of practical information for teachers on how to educate deaf children.

My son had a moderate hearing loss when he was younger and had hearing aids for 18 months. His hearing is still boarderline, but he has done well with synthetic phonics. My son still gets mixed up with "f" and "th" sound and he also cannot he "s" when he has a cold. He can hear all the other sounds of English though. He has to work harder to learn how to spell.

I think it would be worth getting hold of a copy of the little girl's audiogram. This web page shows where in the frequency range various sounds of speech are.

http://www.hdhearing.com/learning/part2.htm

If you are using phonics then its worth teaching blending with sounds the child can hear. What is the girl's speech like? Is she aided?

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Debbie Hepplewhite
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Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Wed Dec 02, 2009 10:27 am

Frances5 - thank you for this link.

I think many people should find it very interesting and very easy to read and understand. :grin:

Tricia
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Post by Tricia » Thu Dec 03, 2009 5:55 am

Thank you Frances. I'll pass this information onto her mum.
Tricia Millar
http://www.thatreadingthing.com
http://trt-for-teachers.com/
@TRT_Tricia

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