Dyslexia revisited

Moderators: Debbie Hepplewhite, maizie, Lesley Drake, Susan Godsland

Post Reply
James Curran
Posts: 123
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:24 am

Dyslexia revisited

Post by James Curran » Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:04 am

Dyslexia revisited
It’s time to take a fresh look at some of the commonly held beliefs about dyslexia, writes Sarah Driver

https://senmagazine.co.uk/home/articles ... -revisited

SLloyd
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2003 6:05 pm

Re: Dyslexia revisited

Post by SLloyd » Wed Jun 07, 2017 5:29 pm

Sadly it seems that Sarah Driver does not realise that the children she refers to, whether dyslexic or not, could have overcome their reading and writing problems, at an early age, through the use of strong synthetic-phonics classroom teaching and intervention. Dr Marlynne Grant has clearly shown this to be the case in her 'Longitudinal Research on Synthetic Phonics'.

http://www.syntheticphonics.net/pdf/2014-Report.pdf:-

“These studies demonstrate that dyslexia does not develop when children begin with a good synthetic phonics programme and when slow-to-start children are given extra practice and teaching with synthetic phonics in order to keep up. Not a single child in the studies developed severe literacy difficulties.”

User avatar
Debbie Hepplewhite
Administrator
Posts: 3653
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 4:13 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Dyslexia revisited

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Sun Jul 02, 2017 9:27 am

The Driver Youth Trust is an organisation focused on SEND (special educational needs and disabilities) - particularly on 'dyslexia'.

Chris Rossiter of the Driver Youth Trust is very much in the forefront of promoting the organisation and its work, but he also has very worrying ideas that 'phonics' doesn't suit every child. This notion is certainly, in my opinion, a pervading message of DYT and very worrying.

Susan Godsland flagged up some DYT free resources which promote multi-cueing reading strategies - a clear sign that the organisation is not truly up to speed with the international findings of research.

I have flagged up the worries about this organisation through various routes including twitter, a talk I was invited to present at a joint researchED and Oxford University Press literacy conference, via my blog at www.phonicsintervention.com, via the online version of the Times Educational Supplement (a reader's comment in response to a piece by Helen Ward) and via the forum of the International Foundation for Effective Reading Instruction which you can see here (includes the details of the issue and my comments):

http://www.iferi.org/iferi_forum/viewto ... ?f=2&t=771

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests