Are grammar schools the best way to address social mobility?

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Elizabeth
Posts: 993
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 8:47 pm

Are grammar schools the best way to address social mobility?

Post by Elizabeth » Tue May 30, 2017 8:58 am

See: https://thinkingreadingwritings.wordpre ... -mobility/
You may think that providing disadvantaged children with the opportunity to attend a grammar school – supposedly resulting in a more academic education – would go some way to addressing that disadvantage, but it isn’t. It’s a diversion from a much more important solution.

... The question of social justice goes far beyond equitable access to schooling; it continues throughout life, and literacy is one of the key drivers of social mobility.

... In fact, low literacy is an entirely solvable problem. We know how to teach reading: use effective close assessment, eliminate the use of damaging and counterproductive labels, and employ thorough, measurable, evidence-informed teaching. The same is true of writing and spelling: systematic, explicit teaching with carefully selected exemplars and guided practice will make a huge difference.
Elizabeth

James Curran
Posts: 111
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:24 am

Re: Are grammar schools the best way to address social mobility?

Post by James Curran » Wed May 31, 2017 8:32 am

Grammar schools dominated by the wealthy, DfE's own data shows


Analysts say data released to show benefits for ‘ordinary working families’ just confirms advantage of higher earners

Grammar schools are dominated by children from well-off and middle class families, according to figures released by the government in its effort to show that “ordinary working families” would benefit most.

Education experts said data published by the Department for Education (DfE) demonstrated that the children of the highest earners were more likely than not to win places at selective schools.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 ... data-shows

James Curran
Posts: 111
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:24 am

Re: Are grammar schools the best way to address social mobility?

Post by James Curran » Sun Jun 04, 2017 10:02 am

Good schools are full of good pupils or to put it another way good schools are full of more advantaged children and there are too many schools in the UK with unacceptably high concentrations of poverty and it is these concentrations of poverty that are doing untold damage to so many children. Mark Langhammer of the ATL in a letter to the Irish News concluded by saying, ‘ So if we are really to make a difference, if standards really are to rise for all, we need schools which are socially mixed, in which peer group pressure can be used effectively to open minds, change outlooks, and raise aspirations . Schools that do not have this mix always struggle.’

According to the OECD schools in the UK are among the most socially segregated in Western Europe. Research by the Sutton Trust in 2013 showed that the top 500 comprehensive schools based on scores in the English Baccalaureate had on average 7.2 % of their pupils on the free school meals register compared to a national average of 16.5%.

Almost 20% of American students about 9 million attend high poverty schools ( 50%+ free school meals ) on the PISA scores for 2009 the only country to finish below this group were Mexico. Those who attended schools where up to 24.9% of the students were on the free school meals register about 26 million students , had average scores on the PISA tests ( 2009 ) exceeded by only two other developed countries.

Finland , often held up as a remarkable education success story – had the lowest degree of socio- economic segregation of the 57 countries participating in PISA

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