we're not reading – so why do we assume children will?

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James Curran
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Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:24 am

we're not reading – so why do we assume children will?

Post by James Curran » Sun May 28, 2017 9:02 pm

Secret Teacher: we're not reading – so why do we assume children will?
English teachers at my school don’t have time to read whole books, and are told to rely on extracts in class. This is no way to inspire a love of literature

https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-net ... ldren-will

chew8
Posts: 4142
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2003 6:26 pm

Re: we're not reading – so why do we assume children will?

Post by chew8 » Mon May 29, 2017 11:02 am

I last taught GCSE in 2000, but things must have changed since then, as we certainly read whole books with students in those days, not just extracts.

'Secret teacher' writes 'Even in my own English literature degree, we were often only given a booklet of chapters and extracts'. I find that quite shocking. Degree courses in English literature (and even A-Level courses) should expect students to read a substantial number of complete texts from different periods. I've recently been re-reading 19th century novels and loving them, but I think I would find them very hard going if school and university hadn't given me the right kind of training.

Fortunately, I find in my voluntary work that some children, at least, still cope well with whole books of a reasonable length.

Jenny C.

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