Boys 'twice as likely to fall behind girls' in early years

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JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Boys 'twice as likely to fall behind girls' in early years

Post by JIM CURRAN » Wed Jul 20, 2016 6:32 am

Boys 'twice as likely to fall behind girls' in early years

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-36803400

JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Re: Boys 'twice as likely to fall behind girls' in early years

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun Jul 24, 2016 7:51 am

The most effective way to ensure that all children come to school prepared to take advantage of the educational opportunities available is to provide high quality early intervention programmes. The most effective programmes involve children spending at least three years in a pre-school setting with high quality staff and a mixture of children from different socio- economic backgrounds and it is this mixture of children that can make all the difference.

Jeanne Reid an American teacher and researcher examined the performance of 2,966 four year old students in 704 pre-kindergarten classrooms located in eleven states. She found that being in a classroom with an above average socio-economic composition had a very significant impact on achievement in receptive language, expressive language and maths learning. The results of this study are all the more remarkable given the fact that many of the children in the study were part-time students who spent on average 2.7 hours per day in pre-school. Reid found that the benefits of being in one of these classrooms extended to all the children and not just those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Professor James Flynn a world renowned expert on theories of intelligence uses the phrase ‘company you keep’ to explain how potent the peer group can be in promoting test scores. We need to structure the early years learning environment so that young children from disadvantaged backgrounds can benefit from this type of positive peer group interaction. The message is clear, poor children need to be in classrooms full of more advantaged children.

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