Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

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JIM CURRAN
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Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by JIM CURRAN » Fri Oct 16, 2015 5:44 pm

Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

http://www.educationviews.org/reading-t ... -epiphany/

Check out the short video,"Reading is Easy"

Elizabeth
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Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by Elizabeth » Mon Oct 19, 2015 5:17 pm

I watched some of the videos. It is interesting to learn how the American approach is the same as the English approach and how it is different. I am talking about the approach used by Americans who understand that you teach reading by teaching how letters represent sounds, not those who encourage guessing strategies. We are on the same side, but there are differences where I think the English approach is more straightforward and easier for pupils.

Most American phonics programmes appear to begin with the 26 letters of the alphabet, including or beginning with the names of the letters, as well as the sounds the letters usually represent. Then they teach things like 'blends', digraphs, long and short vowel sounds, etc.

Most modern English phonics programmes begin with the 40+ sounds of English and how they are represented by letters, first mainly one-to-one correspondence between sounds and letters and then other ways to spell the sounds. For example, first the sound /ee/ as in 'deep', and later the sound /ee/ as in 'peach', 'happy', 'me', etc.

There are other differences, but that is the one I noticed on this link.
Elizabeth

JIM CURRAN
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Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by JIM CURRAN » Mon Oct 19, 2015 6:57 pm

I was interested in Sigfried Engelmann's comment,"I have never seen a kid with an IQ over 80 that could not be taught to read in a timely manner ( one school year )".

It's the reference to IQ that intrigues me.

Elizabeth
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Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by Elizabeth » Thu Oct 22, 2015 11:56 am

Yes, it is an important message to get across - that a child with a low IQ can be taught to read, with effective instruction.
Elizabeth

chew8
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Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by chew8 » Thu Oct 22, 2015 5:57 pm

We surely have to take Engelmann's reference to IQ in the context of the whole sentence. Isn't he implying that it may take a bit longer than one school year if the child has an IQ below 80? I don't have a problem with that.

Jenny C.

JIM CURRAN
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Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by JIM CURRAN » Fri Oct 23, 2015 1:46 pm

I agree Jenny, but unfortunately I feel that low IQ has been used as an excuse for children not learning to read.I remember in the early 1990's when I was on secondment and visiting schools in the Belfast Board area there was a reading support scheme available to struggling readers but it was only available to children of at least average IQ. There seems to be a view, still all too common, in many schools that if some children are not learning to read it's because they're just a bit slower ( lower IQ ) and there's not a lot can be done about it.

cartwheel
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Location: USA

Re: Reading: a Teacher’s Epiphany

Post by cartwheel » Sat Oct 24, 2015 8:59 pm

Elizabeth,
I quite agree with you that in the U.S. even those who use phonics for teaching often use programs that focus on the 26 letters. And even if/when they do get to the advanced code they continue to be primarily grapheme-focused.

I cannot tell you how many times I have heard strong phonics proponents here in the U.S. say things like "children tend to mix up the "a" [letter name given here] sound with the "e" [letter name given here] sound" rather than saying "children tend to mix up the /a/ sound with the /e/ sound." Also, onset-rhyme/"word families" teaching is incredibly common as part of "phonics" teaching here. The English synthetic phonics approach focuses the attention on the CODE much more effectively.

Jennie (U.S.)

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