Music Lessons

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JIM CURRAN
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Music Lessons

Post by JIM CURRAN » Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:10 pm

I came across this interesting piece on BRI.Music Lessons Were the Best Thing Your Parents Ever Did for You, According to Science
http://mic.com/articles/110628/13-scien ... id-for-you

kenm
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Location: Berkshire

Re: Music Lessons

Post by kenm » Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:52 pm

The positive influence of music teaching on other branches of learning was known early in Hungary, where the composer Kodaly created a method for teaching music to primary school children. It was first used in schools in 1943 and expanded to all Hungarian schools by the Communist administration in 1945.

Team sports are often lauded as a method of inculcating discipline and responsibility. Ensemble music does the same without the need for competition and the risk of injury.

Jonathan Dunsby, my Professor at Reading in the nineties, claimed that of graduates seeking immediate employment those from the Music Department were the most successful.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

Derrie Clark
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Re: Music Lessons

Post by Derrie Clark » Wed Sep 09, 2015 7:31 am

The ancient Greeks knew it too:

"I would teach children music, physics, and philosophy; but most importantly music, for the patterns in music and all the arts are the keys to learning."

Plato (around 400 BC)

geraldinecarter
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Re: Music Lessons

Post by geraldinecarter » Fri Sep 11, 2015 9:24 pm

I'd also read this fascinating article. At my children's Brixton Primary in the 80s nearly all 300+ children played an instrument - some of them went no further than recorder (many of the teachers had learned and were able to teach the children). ILEA were incredibly generous with musical instruments (though often they didn't bother to check what happened to the instruments) but there were string and wind instruments and brass and lessons were free. There was also a lot of singing.
The school had incredibly high standards, without any hot housing, and children were praised and respected for doing their best - regardness of their academic ability.
Although it was a time when phonics teaching was frowned upon, the head said that he had never known of a 'dyslexic' child, and somehow virtually all children learned to read in this structured school. It's always puzzled me, and rightly or wrongly, I've attributed this largely to the fact that all children could read music and almost all could play an instrument.

kenm
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Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: Berkshire

Re: Music Lessons

Post by kenm » Sat Sep 12, 2015 8:37 am

European staff musical notation* is a surprisingly well unified method of prescribing sounds, with rather few competing signs for particular features, or signs whose meaning varies with context. Italian music and musicians were dominant over most of Europe from c. 1500 to 1700, so their language became the standard for most of the nations using the Roman alphabet, Germany and France being the main exceptions. I can well believe that there would be a crossover influence on the reading of text.

* Willi Apel describes also five different tablatures: notations that tell players of keyboard and plucked strings (lutes and guitars) where to put their fingers.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

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