Summer born children and the postcode lottery

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JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Summer born children and the postcode lottery

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sat Jun 06, 2015 5:47 pm

Too much, too young for summer-born children forced into ‘big school’
At about 4pm in a bright, airy south London home, Liz Field jumps up to get the door as her four-year-old son Cian returns from nursery.

“Hey, big guy! How’re you doing?”

“I’m well, thank you,” Cian replies carefully while wrestling his arm out of a bright-yellow raincoat.

Cian will turn five on 30 August – so he must legally start school in September. But because he is young for his age group and has developmental problems, his parents want him to go into reception rather than into year 1, which technically he should do.

Field, who is originally from the US, says she thought a request to Lambeth council for Cian to be taught with children who would be five in the next school year, rather than those who would soon be six, would be a straightforward matter. But it was rejected. When we met, he was still without a school place for September.
http://www.theguardian.com/education/20 ... school-age

kenm
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: Berkshire

Re: Summer born children and the postcode lottery

Post by kenm » Sat Jun 06, 2015 8:36 pm

TheGuardian wrote:Susan King, from Norfolk, now educates her son Tom at home after battling for him to be kept back a year. Tom, who was born on 28 August 2005, still struggled to dress himself when he started primary school a few days after his fifth birthday.
If the various aspects of a child's development are not in step according to DfE's expectations, this is often a good solution, especially if intellectual skills are in advance of physical development.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Re: Summer born children and the postcode lottery

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun Jun 07, 2015 8:10 am

How creeping and crawling influence children’s first step in education
The movement babies experience by lying on the floor, waving their arms and legs in the air, is essential to their development.

It’s endearing the way newborn babies fling their arms out when somebody closes a door too loudly, in what is known as the “startle” reflex. And the way they instinctively grasp an outstretched finger, or turn their heads to “root” when their cheek is stroked.
These are all examples of primitive reflexes that should disappear between six and 12 months as the brain starts to inhibit them when more sophisticated, neural functioning begins to develop. If these reflexes persist, they will interfere with the mastering of intentional control of muscles and, in the run-up to starting school, hinder the development of physical readiness for academic learning.
http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-styl ... -1.2225493

JIM CURRAN
Posts: 3123
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:18 am

Re: Summer born children and the postcode lottery

Post by JIM CURRAN » Tue Jun 09, 2015 6:55 am

Summer-born children in danger of being left behind, says school study
Summer-born children are at risk of behaviour problems and poor academic attainment in their first year at school unless the curriculum is tailored to take their needs into account, according to research.

The major study found that the early years foundation curriculum in England favours older children with more advanced language skills, and that children born in the summer months – who can be almost a year younger than their classmates – were in danger of being left behind.

Published on Thursday in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, the research found that the youngest children were almost twice as likely to have both language difficulties and behaviour problems relative to older children in the same reception class.
http://www.theguardian.com/education/20 ... says-study

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