Some Bank Holiday light reading

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maizie
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Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by maizie » Fri Apr 03, 2015 11:34 am

Those of us on Twitter tend to forget that twitter is not the centre of the social media universe. Consequently, we get to see all sorts of good things about phonics (and an incredible number of bad things) without passing on what we've seen.

Every so often there is a good old row/debate about Synthetic Phonics and the Phonics Screening Check (PSC). This usually spawns some excellent blogs and the latest spat in the past couple of days is no exception.

Pride of place goes to Heather F with this superb blog responding to a discussion about the practice of teachers making children learn 'nonsense words' in preparation for the PSC:

https://heatherfblog.wordpress.com/2015 ... judgement/

(Heather includes screen shots of 'tweets', which give a good idea of how twitter 'works')

OldAndrew, a prolific long time blogger, may be a Maths Teacher but he has been a staunch supporter of SSP for many years. Here he is on the discrediting of arguments agains the PSC:

https://teachingbattleground.wordpress. ... ment-20506

Interesting comments on both

Not a blog, but 'The Conversation' often publishes interesting articles with equally interesting comments. This is the latest, about Reading Recovery "There are many remedial programs superior to Reading Recovery " (Sorry, couldn't resist that...)

https://theconversation.com/there-are-m ... very-39574

Usually an article about reading on the Australian version of The Conversation' spawns a great many pro Mixed Methods/Balanced Reading comments, this one doesn't seem to have done.

Could post more but am being summonsed to do domestic tasks :grin: Perhaps other tweeters might add some more :?:

cartwheel
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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by cartwheel » Fri Apr 03, 2015 10:54 pm

Well, Spelfabet often has a good post, such as:
http://www.spelfabet.com.au/2015/03/one ... -epiphany/

Jennie (U.S.)

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maizie
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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by maizie » Sat Apr 04, 2015 2:15 pm

Thanks Jennie, Alison is always worth a read. :grin:

Everyone is welcome to add to this thread; there is lots of interesting stuff out there.

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Susan Godsland
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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by Susan Godsland » Sat Apr 04, 2015 4:35 pm

Fab blog from Katie Ashford, English teacher and Director of Inclusion at Michaela Community School.

How can we increase a child's vocabulary?

https://tabularasaeducation.wordpress.c ... /03/vocab/

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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by Susan Godsland » Sat Apr 04, 2015 4:53 pm

It's not all sweetness and light :mrgreen:

Jules Daulby: Mother Courage of the Reading Wars
I am not against phonics – I say that despite being labelled a phonics denialist.

I teach phonics. I know my phoneme from my grapheme, I can split a digraph (or diagraff as my daughter calls it) at 40 paces, I can spot a medial vowel sound from an initial blend.

So, why am I so against the phonic check?
https://mainstreamsen.wordpress.com/201 ... ding-wars/

Scroll down to read excellent responses from John Walker (theliteracyblog) and Prof.Pamela Snow amongst others.

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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by Susan Godsland » Fri Apr 10, 2015 10:17 am

https://news.tes.co.uk/b/tes-profession ... -head.aspx
“As an experienced professional, I view the idea of a narrow curriculum with disdain and fear. Yet I have to face reality: without the appropriate academic skills, our children’s futures will inevitably be stunted,” he writes.

“The brutal truth – away from the league tables, data sheets and inspections – is that our children need to succeed, and for that they need the very best numeracy and literacy skills. Can we achieve this without compromising our principles? I think so. We may have to slim down the curriculum, but this doesn’t have to mean students sitting in rows, reciting spelling charts and times tables. We did it differently.”

Shipp sat down with staff and planned the school’s new curriculum. It involved stripping back content to focus on the core skills of literacy and numeracy.

kestrel
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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by kestrel » Fri Apr 10, 2015 3:17 pm

I love the fact that "writing reports in science" is an innovation ...unfortunately in many primary schools it would be, with comic strips and posters, or groupwork with one pupil acting as scribe being preferred as more "engaging" .

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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by kenm » Sat Apr 11, 2015 10:32 am

Hunter Diack[url=https://tabularasaeducation.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/vocab/]([b][color=#BF4000]here[/color][/b])[/url] wrote:What is the best synonym for ‘appreciation’?

Desire
Disaster
Gratitude
Relationship
Alleviate
I would have failed this one: none of my uses for "appreciation" (mostly relating to "to estimate justly" and "to increase in value") are offered. I presume (from consulting my 2009 Chambers dictionary) that his "right" answer is "Gratitude", a meaning that did not appear in the Chambers I bought in 1999. Nearest are "[Appreciate]... to be fully sensible of all the qualities in" and "to estimate highly".

Languages need to cope with new concepts, and adding to the meanings of a familiar word is sometimes better than inventing a new one, but replacling a satisfactory word with one that is alredy overloaded is disruptive.
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

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maizie
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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by maizie » Sat Apr 11, 2015 9:30 pm

kenm wrote:Languages need to cope with new concepts, and adding to the meanings of a familiar word is sometimes better than inventing a new one, but replacling a satisfactory word with one that is alredy overloaded is disruptive.
I entirely agree with you, Ken, but as I understand it, we are just resisting change in language :sad:

What I cannot understand is that 'change' frequently means losing subtle distinctions which enrich language. The transformation of 'convince' into a synonym for 'persuade' is a case in point. Is it just that all those Look & Say/Mixed Methods taught children (now adult) never got to read widely enough to appreciate the nice distinction between such words? ;-)

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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by kenm » Sat Apr 11, 2015 10:04 pm

maizie wrote:What I cannot understand is that 'change' frequently means losing subtle distinctions which enrich language. The transformation of 'convince' into a synonym for 'persuade' is a case in point. Is it just that all those Look & Say/Mixed Methods taught children (now adult) never got to read widely enough to appreciate the nice distinction between such words? ;-)
"Refute" being used by politicians and others without any evidence, so what they are actually doing is deny.

I keep hearing floating participles, but I can't remember being taught anything about them at my grammar schools. When and how should one learn about them?
"... the innovator has as enemies all those who have done well under the old regime, and only lukewarm allies among those who may do well under the new." Niccolo Macchiavelli, "The Prince", Chapter 6

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Re: Some Bank Holiday light reading

Post by chew8 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 12:27 pm

I was taught about them, and also taught them, at secondary level. In teaching them, I often made use of sentences which conveyed a ridiculous idea - e.g. 'Being in a dilapidated condition, I bought the car very cheaply' and 'Having spent all day on a coach, the hotel was a welcome sight'.

Jenny C.

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