Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

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Susan Godsland
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Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Susan Godsland » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:55 pm

New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies. Vol. 49, No. 1, 2014
SPELD NZ remedial intervention for dyslexia -a pilot study.
Karen E. Waldie, Jack Austin, John A. Hattie and Marion Fairbrass 1
http://t.co/SoRkW5fli1
Abstract
Intensive tutoring has been shown to be effective in improving the academic skills of children intervention. The 42 participants were aged seven years and in Year 3 in 2011. The teaching provided was one to one from qualified SPELD NZ teachers. Analyses were conducted onJohnson III (WJIII) scores post-¬test compared to pre-¬study assessment.
Analyses revealed significant scores gains in both the WJIII Cognitive Abilities and Test of
Achievement. Noteworthy were the large effect sizes post-¬remediation from the broad reading skills cluster, the word attack subscale and verbal comprehension. Less expected, however, were the large gains from measures of cognitive efficiency and processing speed. Taken together, the findings support the conclusion that SPELD NZ interventions can be most
effective in lifting specific and broad achievement levels for students with dyslexia


page2.
All participants attended New Zealand State and Integrated Schools, staffed by
New Zealand registered teachers, and are inspected by the Education Review Office
(ERO) regularly to ensure that the instruction being given is up to an approved
standard. The students in our sample were all in mainstream classes receiving
instruction via the approach currently accepted as appropriate. As such, we took as a
baseline that an appropriate degree of reading instruction had been received by our
participants, particularly as school assessments had noted lack of progress in the
children in the sample. Whilst there is debate as to whether whole language method
of teaching reading is suitable for all, that discussion is outside the purview of this
study.
page3.
In this study, the teachers, RTLBs and SENCOs, being familiar with the backgrounds of
their students they were involved with, were instructed not to refer students where
learning difficulties were likely to have resulted from one of the following: visual,
hearing or motor impairment;; low general cognitive ability;; economic, cultural or
environmental disadvantage. Given this approach, it is unlikely that the sample
included students whose learning difficulties related to trauma, tuition, or
motivation, although those factors cannot be completely ruled out.
Note also on page 5 ''Of the 42 participants, 27 had taken Reading
Recovery classes (69.2%)''

Derrie Clark
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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Derrie Clark » Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:08 pm

So half of this group had already been through Reading Recovery?

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Susan Godsland » Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:44 pm

Nearly 70% had previously received Reading Recovery tutoring, Derrie, but it proved ineffective because these students have 'dyslexia' apparently and RR doesn't seem to work with dyslexics :roll:
p12. That such a high proportion of the sample had been involved in the Reading Recovery
programme may suggest that students with dyslexia are not best provided via that
approach.

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Fri Sep 19, 2014 3:35 pm

Or worse still - RR type methods caused the 'dyslexia' in the first place! :???:

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Derrie Clark » Fri Sep 19, 2014 5:53 pm

That's interesting ... The House of Commons Science and Technology Committeee (2009-10) in the Report of the Evidence Check of early literacy interventions concluded that the term 'dyslexia' was not useful from an educational point of view because
. . . the techniques to teach a child diagnosed with dyslexia to read are exactly the same as the techniques used to teach any other struggling reader." (p.28)
Debbie said:
Or worse still - RR type methods caused the 'dyslexia' in the first place!
Indeed, as we know the RR method actually distracts children from what they should be learning to become skilled readers - that is the skills and knowledge to deal with the writing system.

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by maizie » Fri Sep 19, 2014 6:31 pm

Derrie Clark wrote:ndeed, as we know the RR method actually distracts children from what they should be learning to become skilled readers - that is the skills and knowledge to deal with the writing system.
Funny, I've just said much the same sort of thing on another forum today :grin:

http://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/primary/218 ... -programme

Depressing thread to read...

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sat Sep 20, 2014 6:16 pm

This study has excluded so many categories of students that I find it difficult to take it seriously. I now realise that I have spent my whole life teaching mainly children from these excluded groups.If 70% of these 'better' children were failed by RR it really is time for RR to pack it in.

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Re: Paper: SPELD NZ remedial intervention for 'dyslexia'

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:32 pm

If 70% of these 'better' children were failed by RR it really is time for RR to pack it in.
...and so say all of us.

But it will never happen - it's called entrenched institutionalism.

Another scary and unaccountable state of affairs along with our state schools becoming increasingly privatised.

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