Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

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Kiki
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Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by Kiki » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:27 am

Could someone please point me in the direction of any scholarly research that illustrates the effects of good phonics teaching for lower socio-economic groups and EAL pupils.

Thank you

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Debbie Hepplewhite
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Re: Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by Debbie Hepplewhite » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:27 pm

It's kind of embodied in all good quality research and studies - were you looking for it for any particular set of circumstances?

The essence of all the research is that lower socio-economic groups and learners with EAL particularly benefit from explicit and systematic code-based instruction in the sense that they may not have the advantage of 'literacy cultural capital' (in the words of the latest report in New Zealand headed by Chapman and Tunmer - see recent postings).

We also know, however, that there are many learners who do, in effect, have 'literacy cultural capital' and still need explict code-based instruction as highlighted by Jim Curran's recent posting about an ex-pupil of his.

Kiki
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Re: Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by Kiki » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:42 pm

just looking for something that really spells it out (with data) and makes it clear to anyone seeking to reduce any attainment gap btw middle-class high achievers and lower socio-economic and EAL pupils that systematic synthetic phonics is the way to reduce that

pjay
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Re: Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by pjay » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:31 pm

I can certainly supply you with plenty of (anecdotal) evidence of the success of SP with EAL pupils but please be careful of conflating EAL and disadvantage. Although many of our EAL pupils come from homes that may be 'disadvantaged' in economic terms they come from supportive families who need no convincing of the value of education and who are extremely supportive of their children and of the school. I wish all our pupils had the support that our EAL pupils have. Many of their parents are actually well qualified in their country of origin and are engaged in low wage jobs here for a variety of reasons.

Kiki
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Re: Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by Kiki » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:29 pm

don't worry, conflation free zone here ;-)

JIM CURRAN
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Re: Research concerning lower socio-economic groups and EAL

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun Aug 11, 2013 8:04 am

Hi KiKi, you might find it useful to read through the Clackmannanshire research where a synthetic phonics programme was used first and fast with a group of school children from a socially disadvantaged area, over 40% on the free school meals register. The results are impressive : "It can be seen that the gains made in word reading in Primary 1 had increased 6 fold by the end of Primary 7, going from 7 months to 3 years 6 months ahead of chronological age. The gain in spelling was 4.5 fold, going from 7 months to 1 year 9 months ahead of chronological age. This is very unusual, as the effects of training programmes usually wash out rather than increase out (Ehri et al, 2001). Although reading comprehension scores were tending to diminish over time, at the end of the study they were still significantly above chronological age and were good given the children's somewhat below average levels of vocabulary knowledge."

There's also a short section on socio economic background : " Are children from less well off homes at a disadvantage in learning to read?

Generally this is true, but with synthetic phonics teaching the children from disadvantaged homes kept pace with those from more advantaged homes until near the end of primary schooling."

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications ... 0682/52383

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