BBC1 tonight: Teacher Squad.

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bwking
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Post by bwking » Sun Dec 17, 2006 1:24 am

Oh, you kid! (That's Eddie Cantorese, for the less social-historically informed, I believe).

B.

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maizie
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Post by maizie » Sun Dec 17, 2006 1:28 am

But, Brian and Geraldine,

Secondary schools are reeling from the numbers of semi-literate children they have to accept from primary. Unless they have a very good Senco, they have no idea what to do with these children. They believe that the children were properly instructed in reading in their primaries (because no-one at secondary, apart from an occasional Senco, has any knowledge of how to teach children to read, so they can't be critical of NLS in any way) and conclude it must be a defect in the children. They think it's normal. These children cannot learn to read, their failure in primary has proved this, so secs. must work to accomodate them.

Secondary intervention mostly comprises desperate scrabbling to find 'engaging' books with low 'reading ages' ( which are always levelled on whole language criteria) as, don't we all know, 'readingalot' improves reading, exercises in basic grammar & punctuation, Look, Cover, Write & Check spellings (or just plain, brutal memorisation) more work on the HFWs they've been trying to learn for the last 6 years, matching word shapes, cloze procedures, simplified work sheets in lessons (still not decodeable, though) etc. etc.

Just to add to the mess, no KS3 literacy adviser will acknowledge that children reach secondary unable to read. A L3 at KS2 is regarded as sufficient for access to the secondary curriculum, this is the gospel according to the Establishement.

I am not at all surprised at the reaction of teachers on TES. Secondary teachers don't, on the whole, associate not being able to read with poor behaviour.

I have just read, on another list, of a secondary school with 50% of its children classed as SEN. Well, it does help HTs explain away poor results...

bwking
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Post by bwking » Sun Dec 17, 2006 1:48 am

To be specific, in Tony's case, one Peter Thompson (says he, after doing a quick google) a leading Christian Socialist.

B.

MonaMMcNee
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BBC1

Post by MonaMMcNee » Sun Dec 17, 2006 5:12 am

thinking about secodnary provision gets us nowhere until primary schools teach 99% of their pupils to read. Then secodnary (comprehensive or selective) can do a proper job. But we do need electricians, gardeners etc. Perhaps there could be a core of maths, literacy, and then a range of threads within a comprehensive.
But the big change has to come from having an 11+ intake that can read, spell, and do basic maths. It is this lack that has dragged down all post-primary education.

JIM CURRAN
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Subject

Post by JIM CURRAN » Sun Dec 17, 2006 8:43 am

Maizie, is absolutely right. Secondary schools are "reeling" from the numbers of semi- literate children arriving from the primary sector and the reason that Secondary school teachers have kept quiet is that they just didn't know any better. For years I myself just accepted this situation as normal and thought that these children were just slow learners.Professor Donald Nathanson, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behaviour at Jefferson Medical College in his Children Of The Code Interview with David Boulton explains how young children when they fail to learn to read and see many others around them appearing to learn effortlessly, develop a sense of "shame" which becomes internalised and which makes it very difficult for them to learn and function in a school setting.These children get caught up in a loop of poor behaviour, poor concentration, inattentiveness and avoidance. So when they come to the Secondary school not only can they not access the curriculum because of their weak literacy skills but more poignantly the motivation and curiosity so vital for success in education have been extinguished.

MonaMMcNee
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secondary intake

Post by MonaMMcNee » Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:00 am

Jim Curran is right. But teachers themselves have lost out, lost the wonderful job satisfaction that teachers get when they can see the whole class learning, succeeding.
Teachers should sue the professors who mistrained them! instead of protecting them yet again in their errors. Perhaps teachers will, after some parents have sued the teachers who crippled, disabled their children!

bwking
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Post by bwking » Tue Dec 19, 2006 12:00 am

Yes, school should be an oasis of calm rationality, where the lessons of two and a half thousand years of alphabetic code-based teaching should be handed on, to the pleasure of both teacher and pupil.

What is preventing this joyful transmission of our cultural heritage, which is plain to read in any number of publications, but non-scientific, emotional, religious, socialistic/Romantic thinking coupled - in the case of the educational writers - with the desire to maintain income?

I have knocked Christians etc. for their different priorities, but there is no doubt that in the time of the Reformation there was a mighty move to get education down to the people. The fact that the exigencies of the working day excluded many/most of the children of the working people from taking advantage of the 'free' grammar schools only mildly detracts from the ethos of the movement.

The crying need for our present age is an appreciation that these do-gooding instincts can be validated by scientific observation: that everyone involved in education can ENJOY the taking of littlies through the necessary business of becoming literate, and therefore culturally human - as much as those worthy successful local folk who endowed a school in their locality in the spirit of Christian charity (and hope of a better place in heaven)...that the country as a whole must benefit, if kids don't grow up resentful of their failure to become as literate as their ancestors of a couple of centuries ago usually were.

B.

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